Article Types

JPR - Guidelines for Authors

 

 

Page contents

Article Types

Review Articles

Systematic review with or without Meta-analysis

Narrative review

Case Report

Case Report and Review the literatures

Other Submissions

Original article

Editorials

Letters to the Editor

New Manuscripts

Article  sections

Title page

 

Abstract and Keywords

 

Introduction

 

Review or materials and methods

 

Results

 

Discussion

 

Conclusions

 

Acknowledgements

 

References

 

Manuscript Details

Tables

 

Figures

 

References

 

Statistical Methods

 

Units of Measurement

 

Abbreviations and symbols

 

Drug Names

 

Ethical guidelines

 

Assurances

 

Copyright

 

Peer review process

 

Appendix

Figures and Tables

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article Types

The peer-review process is applied to all submissions.

Review Articles

Review articles are usually solicited by the editors, but we will consider unsolicited material.Consequently, they may include material that might be considered too introductory for specialists in the field being covered.

Systematic review

Systematic review attempts to collate all empirical evidence that fits pre-specified eligibility criteria in order to answer a specific research question.  It uses explicit, systematic methods that are selected with a view to minimizing bias, thus providing more reliable findings from which conclusions can be drawn and decisions made. The key characteristics of a systematic review are:

·  a clearly stated set of objectives with pre-defined eligibility criteria for studies;

·  an explicit, reproducible methodology;

·  a systematic search that attempts to identify all studies that would meet the eligibility criteria;

·  an assessment of the validity of the findings of the included studies, for example through the assessment of risk of bias; and

·  A systematic presentation, and synthesis, of the characteristics and findings of the included studies.

Many systematic reviews contain meta-analyses. Meta-analysis is the use of statistical methods to summarize the results of independent studies. By combining information from all relevant studies, meta-analyses can provide more precise estimates of the effects of health care than those derived from the individual studies included within a review. They also facilitate investigations of the consistency of evidence across studies and the exploration of differences across studies.

Narrative review

A narrative review discusses and summarizes the literature on a particular topic, without generating any pooled summary figures through meta-analysis. This type of review usually gives a comprehensive overview of a topic, rather than addressing a specific question such as how effective a treatment is for a particular condition. Narrative reviews do not often report on how the search for literature was carried out or how it was decided which studies were relevant to include. Therefore, they are not classified as systematic reviews.

Case report and Review the literature

Case report

The Case report articles or the case series generally include some brief review in the related subject, but we consider only the articles have proper review of literature in the manner of a short narrative review

Other Submissions

 Original Article 

should be divided into the following sections:

 - Title page

 - Abstract (with Keywords)

 - Introduction

 - Materials and Methods

 - Results

 - Discussion

 - Conclusions

 - Acknowledgements

 - Conflicts of Interest

 - Funding / support
 - References

 

 Title Page

 The title page should have the following information:

 - Article title

 - Full author names

 - Full name(s) of department and/or institutional affiliations

- Contact information for corresponding authors including: The name, mailing address, telephone and fax numbers, and e-mail address 

 - Running title no more than 50 characters (including letters and spaces) 

 

 Abstract

 Structured abstracts not exceed 250 words are preferred for original research. The structured abstract  should be included: background  and purpose, Materials and Methods, Results Conclusions, and 3 to 5 keywords.

 

 Introduction

 This section should be state the purpose and summarize the rationale for the study or observation.

 

 Materials and Methods

 This part should contain sufficient detail so that all procedures can be repeated. It can be divided into  subsections if several methods are  described.

 

 Results

 This section should present the results in logical sequence in the text, tables, and illustrations, giving  the main or most important  findings first. Do not repeat all the data in the tables or  illustrations in the text; emphasize or summarize only the most important  observations.

 

 Discussion

 In part of the discussion, emphasize the new and important aspects of the study. Do not repeat in  detail data or other information given  in the Introduction or the Results section.

  

 Conclusions

 This should clearly explain the main conclusions of the work highlighting its importance and  relevance.

 

 Acknowledgments

 All acknowledgments (if any) should be included at the very end of the paper before the references  and may include supporting grants,  presentations, and so forth.

 

 References

 Authors are responsible for ensuring that the information in each reference is complete and accurate.  All references must be derived from  the articles and numbered consecutively. Citations  of references in text should be identified using numbers in superscript in sequential  order,  and placed after punctuation. .

 

 Preparation of Figures

 All figures should be in limited numbers, with high quality art work and mounted on separate pages.  The captions should be  placed below. Figures should be supplied in bitmap formats  (Photoshop, TIFF, GIF, JPEG, etc.). The same data should not be  presented in tables,  fig­ures and text, simultane­ously. If the photographs of patients are used, either they should not be  identifiable or the photographs should be accompanied by written permission to use them.

 

 Preparation of Tables

 Tables should be placed on separate pages. Every table must have a descriptive title placed above. Do not submit tables as pho­tographs. Place explanatory matters in footnotes, not in the heading. If numerical measurements are given, the units should be included in the column heading.

 

Editorials

Usually provide commentary and analysis concerning an article in the issue of the JPR in which they appear. They may include 1 figure or table. They are nearly always solicited, although unsolicited editorials may occasionally be considered. Editorials are limited to 750 words, with up to 10 references.

 

Letters to the Editor

Provide a forum for readers to comment about articles recently published in the JPR, and they are a place to publish concise articles.

Conflicts of interest:

Because the essence of review articles is selection and interpretation of the literature, the JPR expects that the authors of such articles will not have significant financial associations with a company (or its competitor) that make a product discussed in the article.

Authors must acknowledge and declare any sources of funding and potential conflicting interest, such as receiving funds or fees by, or holding stocks and shares in, an organization that may profit or lose through publication of your paper. Declaring a competing interest will not lead to automatic rejection of the paper, but we would like to be made aware of it.

 

New Manuscripts

Authors of all types of review articles should follow the general instructions given below. Please see Article Types for word counts and instructions. Please abide by the word count guidelines. 

 

 

Articles should be divided into the following sections:

Title page

It should contain the following information:

1.  Title (the title should be concise, descriptive _not declarative_, and limited to 75 characters)

2.  Corresponding author contact information (name, address, telephone, fax, e-mail), Also list the name of each author, including the first name, and the highest graduate degree; the department and institutional affiliation of each author.

Abstract andKeywords

Systematic Review

It should contain the following information:

1.  Background

2.  Methods

3.  Results

4.  Conclusion

Keywords (3 to 5 Keywords , matched with MeSHhttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/MBrowser.htm)

 

Narrative Review

and

Case Report

A narrative (educational) review may or may not have a structured Abstract; often an unstructured Abstract may be most relevant, followed by at least 3 key words. The number of authors is limited to five.

Introduction

This should summarize the purpose and the rationale for the study. It should neither review the subject extensively nor should it have data or conclusions of the study. As the same of other sections, Introduction must be double-spaced.

Review or materials and methods

Systematic Review

This should include exact method or observation or experiment. If an apparatus is used, its manufacturer’s name and address should be given in parenthesis. If the method is established, give reference but if the method is new, give enough information so that another author is able to perform it. If a drug is used, its generic name, dose and route of administration must be given. For patients, age, sex with mean age ± standard deviation must be given. Statistical method must be mentioned and specify any general computer program used. The Info system used should be clearly mentioned.

 

Narrative Review

and

Case Report

There is usually no Method section but could include Review section.

Results

It must be presented in the form of text, tables and illustrations. The contents of the tables should not be all repeated in the text. Instead, a reference to the table number may be given. Long articles may need sub-headings within some sections (especially the Results and Discussion parts) to clarify their contents.

Discussion

The Discussion should interpret the findings in view of the results obtained in this and in previous studies on this topic. This should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them.

Conclusions

This should emphasize the present findings and the variations or similarities with other work done in the field by other workers. The detailed data should not be repeated in the discussion again. Emphasize the new and important aspects of the study and the conclusions that follow from them. It must be mentioned whether the hypothesis mentioned in the article is true, false or no conclusions can be derived.

Acknowledgements

All contributors who do not meet the criteria for authorship should be covered in the acknowledgement section. It should include persons who provided technical help, writing assistance and departmental head who only provided general support. Financial and material support should also be acknowledged.

References

All manuscripts should be accompanied by relevant references. The author should ensure reference to locally published studies by doing proper literature search. It may not be possible for the editor and reviewers to check the accuracy of all reference citations. To minimize such errors author should verify references against the original documents. See References in Manuscript Details.

For further information regarding manuscripts, please contact JPR.

 

 

 

 

Manuscript Details

Tables

In limited numbers should be submitted with the captions placed above. Do not submit tables as pho­tograph. Place explanatory matters in footnotes, not in the heading.

Figures

Should be in limited numbers, with high quality art work and mounted on separate pages. The captions should be placed below. The same data should not be presented in tables, fig­ures and text, simultane­ously.

It is permissible to send low-resolution images for peer review, although we may ask for high-resolution files at a later stage.

We can accept electronic files in the following formats: GIF, JPEG

If photographs of patients are used, either they should not be identifiable or the photographs should be accompanied by written permission to use them.

References

References must be double-spaced and numbered consecutively as they are cited. References first cited in a table or figure legend should be numbered so that they will be in sequence with references cited in the text at the point where the table or figure is first mentioned. List all authors when there are six or fewer; when there are seven or more, list the first six, followed by “et al.” The following are sample references:

1.  Journal:
Russell FD, Coppell AL, Davenport AP. In vitro enzymatic processing of radiolabelled big ET-1 in human kidney as a food ingredient. Biochem Pharmacol 1998 Mar 1;55(5):697-701.

2.   Book:
Fauci AS, Braunwald E, Isselbacher KJ, Wilson JD, Martin JB, Kasper DL, et al, editors. Harrison’s principles of internal medicine. 14th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, Health Professions Division; 1998.

3.  Book Chapter:
Porter RJ, Meldrum BS. Antiepileptic drugs. In: Katzung BG, editor. Basic and clinical pharmacology. 6th ed. Norwalk (CN): Appleton and Lange; 1995. p. 361-80.

4.  Conference Papers:
Bengtsson S, Solheim BG. Enforcement of data protection, privacy and security in medical informatics. In: Lun KC, Degoulet P, Piemme TE, Reinhoff O, editors. MEDINFO 92. Proceedings of the 7th World Congress on Medical Informatics; 1992 Sep 6-10; Geneva, Switzerland. Amsterdam: North-Holland; 1992. p. 1561-5.

5. Web Site:
Garfinkel PE, Lin E, Goering P. Should amenorrhoea be necessary for the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa? Br J Psych [serial online] 1996 [cited 1999 Aug 17]; 168(4):500-6. Available from: URL:http://biomed.niss.ac.uk
 

Numbered references to personal communications unpublished data, or manuscripts either “in preparation” or “submitted for publication” are unacceptable. If essential, such material can be incorporated at the appropriate place in the text. For more information please see Vancouver Style.

Statistical Methods

·  The basis for these guidelines is described in Bailar JC III, Mosteller F. Guidelines for statistical reporting in articles for medical journals: amplifications and explanations. Ann Intern Med 1988; 108:266-73.

·  Exact methods should be used as extensively as possible in the analysis of categorical data. For analysis of measurements, nonparametric methods should be used to compare groups when the distribution of the dependent variable is not normal.

·  Results should be presented with only as much precision as is of scientific value. For example, measures of association, such as odds ratios, should ordinarily be reported to two significant digits.

·  Measures of uncertainty, such as confidence intervals, should be used consistently, including in figures that present aggregated results.

·  Except when one-sided tests are required by study design, such as in noninferiority trials, all reported P values should be two-sided. In general, P values larger than 0.01 should be reported to two decimal places, those between 0.01 and 0.001 to three decimal places; P values smaller than 0.001 should be reported as P<0.001. Notable exceptions to this policy include P values arising in the application of stopping rules to the analysis of clinical trials and genetic-screening studies.

·  For tables comparing treatment or exposure groups in a randomized trial (usually the first table in the trial report), significant differences between or among groups should be indicated by * for P < 0.05, ** for P < 0.01, and *** for P < 0.001 with an explanation in the footnote if required. The body of the table should not include a column of P values.

·  In manuscripts that report on randomized clinical trials, authors may provide a flow diagram in CONSORT format and all of the information required by the CONSORT checklist. When restrictions on length prevent the inclusion of some of this information in the manuscript, it may be provided in a separate document submitted with the manuscript. The CONSORT statement, checklist, and flow diagram are available on the CONSORT website

Units of Measurement

Authors should express all measurements in conventional units, with System International (SI) units given in parentheses throughout the text. Figures and tables should use conventional units, with conversion factors given in legends or footnotes. In accordance with the Uniform Requirements, however, manuscripts containing only SI units will not be returned for that reason.

Abbreviations and symbols

Use only standard abbre­viations. Avoid using them in the title and ab­stract. The full term for which an abbre­viation stands should precede its first use in the text unless it is a stan­dard unit of measurement.

Drug Names

Generic names should be used. When proprietary brands are used in research, include the brand name and the name of the manufacturer in parentheses after the first mention of the generic name in the Methods section.

Ethical guidelines

When reporting experiments on human subjects, indicate whether the procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional or regional) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000 (available at http://www.wma.net/e/policy/17-c_e.html). Do not use patients' names, initials, or hospital numbers, especially in illustrative material. When reporting experiments on animals, indicate whether the institution's or a national research council's guide for, or any national law on the care and use of laboratory animals was followed.   It is mandatory to mention the University/ Institutional ethical clearance registration number in the methodology section. 
Publication Ethics
Ethical standards for publication exist to ensure high-quality scientific publications, public trust in scientific findings, and that people receive credit for their ideas. Journal of Pediatrics Review published by Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences is committed to publishing review articles; Systematic review with or without Meta-analysis, Narrative review, Case Report and Review the literatures and Letters to the Editor. So, it is important to avoid the following ethical violations.
 
Data Fabrication and Falsification
Data fabrication and falsification means the researcher did not actually do the study, but made up data or results and had recorded or reported the fabricated information. Data falsification means the researcher did the experiment, but manipulated, changed, or omitted data or results from the research findings. This would lead to public distrust and less willing to provide funding support.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is deliberately using someone else’s language, ideas, or other original material without acknowledging its source and without giving them credit. Copying even one sentence from someone else’s manuscript, or even one of your own that has previously been published, without proper citation is considered plagiarism-use your own words instead.
Simultaneous Submission
Simultaneous submission occurs when a manuscript (or substantial sections from a manuscript) is submitted to a journal when it is already under consideration by another journal.
Duplicate Publication
Duplicate publication occurs when two or more papers, without full cross referencing, share essentially the same hypotheses, data, discussion points, and conclusions.
Redundant Publications
 
Redundant publications involve the inappropriate division of study outcomes into several articles, most often consequent to the desire to plump academic vitae.
Improper Author Contribution or Attribution
All listed authors must have made a significant scientific contribution to the research in the manuscript and approved all its claims. Don’t forget to list everyone who made a significant scientific contribution, including students and laboratory technicians.
Citation Manipulation
Citation Manipulation is including excessive citations, in the submitted manuscript, that do not contribute to the scholarly content of the article and have been included solely for the purpose of increasing citations to a given author’s work, or to articles published in a particular journal. This leads to misrepresenting the importance of the specific work and journal in which it appears and is thus a form of scientific misconduct. In the event that there are documented violations of any of the above mentioned policies in any journal, immediate rejection of the infringing manuscript will be applied.
 

Assurances

In appropriate places in the manuscript, please provide the following items:

·  If applicable, a statement that the research protocol was approved by the relevant institutional review boards or ethics committees and that all human participants gave written informed consent.

·  The identity of those who analyzed the data.

·  For studies caontaining microarrays, the accession numbers and repository name.

Copyright

The entire contents of the JPR are protected under international copyrights. This Journal is for your personal non-commercial use. You may not modify copy, distribute, transmit, display, or publish any materials contained on the Journal without the prior written permission of it or the appropriate copyright owner.

Peer review process

All manuscripts are considered to be confidential. They are peer-reviewed by at least 2 anonymous reviewers selected by the Editorial Board.  The corresponding author is notified as soon as possible of the editor decision to accept, reject, or require modifications. If the manuscript is completely acceptable according to the criteria set forth in these instructions, it is scheduled for the next available issue.

 

Appendix

The Supplementary Appendix should be paginated, with a table of contents, followed by the list of investigators (if there is one), text (such as methods), figures, tables, and then references. 
The reference citations in the Appendix and corresponding list of references should be self-contained with respect to the Appendix.
 
The Appendix must be submitted as a Word file format.

 

Figures and Tables

For outcome scales, provide in the figure legend or table footnotes the range, sign, and minimally important difference (if known).  There must be an informative reference citation for the scale.

Figures

Figures in the Appendix should be labeled Figure S1, Figure S2, etc. 
Each figure should include a title and a legend, which should appear on the same page as the figure itself.

Tables

Tables in the Appendix should be labeled Table S1, Table S2, etc. 
Each table should be accompanied by a title and, if necessary, footnotes.

 

 



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