Volume 12, Issue 1 (1-2024)                   J. Pediatr. Rev 2024, 12(1): 87-94 | Back to browse issues page


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Mohajeri-Tehrani M, Arab F, Salemkar S, Darvishian N, Mohseni F, Larijani B et al . Investigating β Thalassemia Patients and Their Growth: A Brief Review and Our Clinical Experience. J. Pediatr. Rev 2024; 12 (1) :87-94
URL: http://jpr.mazums.ac.ir/article-1-503-en.html
1- Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2- Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. , zohreh.hamidi@gmail.com
Abstract:   (465 Views)
Background: The prevalence of short stature was reported high in thalassemia major patients. It causes mental and social problems for them. As different cut-off points for growth retardation are suggested in these patients, it is desirable to find a careful cut-off age using statistical analysis to help patients before it is too late. 
Methods: Data from 803 thalassemia major patients was extracted from questionnaires completed in person by the operator. They contained demographic data, family, medical, and drug history. Height and weight measurements were conducted by only one device. The mean age was 20±7 years and there were 420 females in the sample. Children (<20 years of age) constituted 47% of the participants. Patients who reported a major risk factor for osteoporosis were omitted from this study. The SPSS software, version 16 was used for the statistical analysis
Results: Short stature was found in 32% of patients. Being 10 to 11 years old or above increased the risk of short stature, 28.5 and 21.4 times, respectively compared to younger patients (P<0.001). On the other hand, after 7 years of age up to 18 years of age, similar to 10 years of age and 11 years of age, increases the risk of short stature. Also being 27 years old and 30 years old and above increases the risk of short stature 1.4 and 1.7 times, respectively, compared to younger patients (P=0.042 and <0.018, respectively). 
Conclusions: Awareness of short stature and monitoring it in thalassemic patients should be done in their childhood. Accordingly, being 7 years old or above increases the risk of short stature; therefore, we suggest the start of monitoring as early as 5 years of age.
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Type of Study: Research Article | Subject: Endocrinology
Received: 2022/10/18 | Accepted: 2023/09/23 | Published: 2024/01/1

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